Monday, May 07, 2007

Much as it pains me to agree with the Tribune editorial board, the proposals of this teachers group to incorporate performance into the way teachers are paid seem pretty sound. Simple seniority-based pay maybe works for post office employees, but who would argue that it makes sense in the public schools?...

5 comments:

Levois said...

Wow this is interesting, but I wonder if these groups of teachers are in the minority. It seems when ever we hear about reforming education in our schools, that the public school teachers unions want to maintain the status quo. This is great but unusual news.

Rob said...

I'd say it's still a pretty marginal idea. For one thing, the teachers group advocating it seems to consist of high-performing teachers, meaning of course they'd be comfortable with performance-based pay. The rest of the teachers, maybe not so much...

Nicole said...

Why is it in the second paragraph of that article, they refer to a teacher as "she"? They even quote a male teacher later on.

Michael Perillo said...

What is the problem this is trying to correct? Who decides who the super-teachers are? Teachers already have national standards in place under No Child Left Behind.

[disclosure] As a former temp. employee of the IEA I can tell you that a system like this would be a boon for racism, nepotism, sexism, good ol' boyism, and cliques.

Why is no one suggesting performance-based payscales and individual evaluations of police, fire fighters, defense contractors, politicians, CEOs etc.? It only follows that fire fighters should be paid based on their body fat percentage, no?

Illinois already has a pretty advanced system of geographic discrimination when it comes to teacher pay. Sure, this new system MIGHT attract some intelligent people to intercity schools where they are needed, but who is going to tell the Bumblefuck school districts that after being underfunded by the state that they need to pay certain young teachers a lot more? Conversely who is going to tell the Bumblefuck teachers, who are severely underpaid already, that they need to step up to the super-teacher standard or face pay cuts and possible termination?

Rob said...

Concerns about how this system would be implemented are hard to rebut -- in Illinois, god knows, if there can be nepotism, good-ol'-boyism, etc. there probably will be.

But is it really impossible to develop smart, neutral performance-based standards? Not the one-size-fits-all standards of NCLB, but something better.